Them

There is a fascinating aspect to Cutia Taranului. If you haven’t heard about it yet then it is a CSA (community supported agriculture) type of service which makes it possible for small scale, local producers to sell their produce directly to customers in the city.Β  In most western cultures food production is largely controlled by large agro-businesses with a (growing) backdrop of small producers who sell to local communities. Here in Romania almost half of the population are peasants who feed themselves and make a scarce living by selling their produce. That means that Cutia Taranului has huge potential outreach … theoretically making it possible for half of the population to feed the other half. It excites me every time I think about.

We’ve been warned quite a few times (so far, by caring people) that the project could generate some serious backfire. If the project spreads, as we hope it will, it could have some … noticeable economic implications. It may cause quite a bit of business to shift from current market places and supermarket chains, directly back into the hands of peasants. That may agitate many stakeholders who are vested in these relatively newΒ  and dominating businesses. So we’ve been warned that they may … get defensive and aggressive. They can be:

  • Supermarket chains who have invested heavily in their infrastructures all over Romania will naturally want to protect their investments.
  • Owners of “market place shopping malls” (closed structures which were built where once there were simple, open farmers-markets which charged a symbolic fee) who charge peasants impossible space rental fees.
  • Organized crime syndicates (which we know little about but have heard mentioned numerous times) who I assume have their vested interests.
  • Government agencies that may be curious about higher levels of income. Peasants are currently registered as small producers and exempt from taxes (after all, no one expects a peasant to be make enough income to justify paying taxes).
  • Government agencies that are used to and expect traditional methods of agriculture and may be threatened by change (our intentions is to change not just how peasant make money but more importantly how they work the land and how they grow food).
  • Corrupt government officials … simply because corruption is a dominant force in Romanian government (national and local) who may either lose their foothold or be interested in getting in on the new action.

Our first reaction to these potential threats is a smile. When Cutia Taranului reaches a point where it draws this kind of attention we’ll know we’ve done something wonderful. It is also amazing to witness how, from a sustainable/ecological perspective, the law and outlaws seem to come together through opposition.

However there is also discomfort. Cutia Taranului has no malintent towards anyone. We are not against supermarkets or city-markets or government (though we are against greed and corruption) … nothing we do is defined as being opposition … everything we do is for someone or something:

  • for peasants who we would like to be able to make a decent living and live a better life.
  • for a peasant life style which is dying and we wish to see revived and refreshed.
  • for city dwellers who we wish will be able to enjoy fresh, healthy and local food.
  • for communities who will become healthier, stronger and more resilient through mutual support and self nurturing.
  • for Romania as a country that will reconnect with its peasant-nature and maintain its ability to feed and sustain itself.

Anyone who finds themselves not aligned with these goals is not in conflict with us or with Cutia Taranului … they are in conflict with communities … maybe even in conflict with Romania as a country. This is what gives us peace of mind. Everyone who has, so far, joined Cutia Taranului (peasant and city-member) has done so based on trust, faith and excitement. THAT is what makes it a force to be reckoned with (should reckoning be required).

Cutia Taranului has resilience designed into it. Once a relationship has been established between a peasant and box-members in the city … and once there are thousands of such relationships all over the country … there is no one central place you can go to shut it down. You can attack Cutia Taranului itself … but the ecosystem as a whole and the communities all over Romania will have a life of their own.

However there is more. We assume that Cutia Taranului itself will require some kind of legal entity. This post is a great opportunity to reach out and ask for people that can help us to do this properly. If you are a lawyer or accountant that cares about this topic as deeply as we do and can help us create a healthy formal position to complement the organic ecosystem then please do contact us.

 

Stainless Steel Mesh

We’ve finally managed to track down here in Romania some stainless steel mesh. Why would we need stainless steel mesh you ask? We are collecting materials to build our first solar dehydrators for food preservation. Regardless of the design you choose to go with (except of course for buying an electric one) you are going to be building trays to place the food on. These are most likely going to be wooden frames with a wire-mesh to place the food on. If you care about what comes in contact with your food and longevity of the trays then you are most probably going to end up with stainless steel.

Today we went to the post office to pay an advance so that the order can be shipped to us. As Andreea was speaking to the lady who accepts payments I had a few seconds to stare at the invoice we brought with us to make payment and that single invoice embodies so much of our experience in creating a sustainable life here in Romania … it seemed worth putting into words. So this post is about that … a post about solar dehydrators will come at a later time πŸ™‚

I’ll start at a point in time at which we already know what we want to do … though getting there is often as demanding a journey as actually creating it. In this case we knew we wanted to go with Solar Drying as a means of preserving food, drying tea leaves, herbs … and eventually using it to dry medicinal plants which is a direction we wish to explore. We started looking around and found a few approaches to dehydration. After much reading and re-reading and head scratching to understand not just design choices but the reasons for them … we settled on a design we wanted to implement.

Then comes the work of more detailed study … there are many details … many of which I can recognize and appreciate only after numerous readings with time and space for contemplation (and even then some considerations only become clear when I actually do the work of construction). By the time I’ve got a good idea of how to approach construction I’ve also got a fairly good grasp of the materials we will need. Many times these materials are new to me.

Then comes the task of tracking them down. Some things are available in the village hardware store, others in the larger DIY chain stores in the city and others are often more difficult (ranging from slightly to damn near impossible) to find. At best, the search needs to be conducted in Romanian (other times I have to find German terms to search either German suppliers or Ebay.de when we can’t find things here in Romania). Sometimes just finding the names or terms in Romanian is a formidable task … one that Andreea has to take on. Then comes the searching. It can take anywhere from hours to days … to weeks (when we get tired of not finding anything and have to take a step back to gain freshness and perspective).

We finally found a source … two online shops for beekeeping equipment. They carry stainless steel mesh that is used for the bottom of beehives (so that Varroa mites can fall out). Andreea called them up but they were out of stock and the density was too lowΒ  … the holes in the mesh were too large … yes you need to know what is the wire thickness and what is either the density (number of wires per centimeter or inch) or hole size. We had to realize that (a) we needed to know these measurements and (b) then locate a mesh with sizes that would work for us.

The search continued … we found one other source in some cheesy Romanian import/export website. We found three kinds of mesh … none of which was suitable … one of which was close enough to warrant further attention. We called and asked for more information … fortunately they had many other sizes. We got a few more quotes. Some were very expensive (prices per square meter) and/or came in very large long roles (which made them even more expensive). We fine=tuned the search and asked for more prices. And then it appeared … an excellent match, mid-range pricing and in a relatively short (10 meter) role.

The prices did not include VAT or shipping. Shipping was expensive … we searched for other options … found none. We decided to go ahead. We placed our order (email communication) and were sent an invoice with a request to pay an advance. It wasn’t cheap … actually its pretty expensive. It scared us … we still don’t have any income … and are trying to keep expenses down … without immobilizing ourselves.

Regular mesh materials (plastic, cheap metals …) can be found for 10-20 lei per square meter. Our stainless steel mesh will cost us more then 150 lei per square meter. For the price of just the steel mesh we could buy a pretty fancy and comfortable electric dryer (and we may yet need a simple one for drying seeds!). Yet solar means no need for electricity. Solar means no dependency on machinery that is bound to fail. Solar means easily being able to scale up our drying operation (already we can go up to 10 sqm of dryers). Stainless steel means our food will be without any chemical contaminants. Stainless steel means it will be easy to keep clean. Stainless steel means, if treated well, it will last us a long long time. In the end, Stainless steel will be not just cheaper … but priceless.

Yet, knowing all this, there is still an emotional fear … for us that is (currently) a lot of money. Sustainable isn’t easy, it is usually more expensive then commercial/industrial alternatives (that are ofen falsely presented as cheap), it requires long term thinking, in the beginning it is usually an unknown, it takes faith, it takes patience, effort and work, it is about building long-lasting infrastructures … and it can lead to an embracing, secure, empowering and abundant life.

All this goes through my mind in the space of a few seconds as I stare at the invoice. Then the lady tells Andreea she can’t help us … some postal services are only available in larger/central post-offices in the city. Sending money this way is, apparently one of those things. So … we still haven’t managed to complete the order … but we are getting there. Then we can move on to the next materials on the list … and hopefully soon we will have everything we need … then … we can get started building the solar dryers … and then enjoy them for life … or at least a very long time πŸ™‚

Mine is smaller then yours

So the other day Ildi calls Andreea and asks if we would like to adopt a dog … one of those small dogs that look up to pinchers. I said no … those are not dogs … and we really don’t need a 3rd dog … and that was that. Then we went over to Ildi and Levente to pick up a few things and there is this … overgrown mouse … and Andreea picks it up … and looks at me, and then everyone else looks at me … and I say … wha the heck. Now we have two dogs and one not dog … meet Ricky:

She’s already a “big dog” … 3 or 4 months old … and she aint going to get much bigger πŸ™‚

Ricky is a lucky dog here in Romania. Romanian villagers shudder at the thought of sterilzing or castrating dogs. So lots of puppies are born … too many puppies. What to do? Drown the extra puppies and keep the ones you want. I kid you not. Well Ricky wasn’t drowned (I told you she was lucky). She was raised for a few months (from the looks of her, in very poor conditions) and seems to have been dumped in the middle of a field. A sheperd found her and brought her to Ildi and Levente … and now she resides with us here at Bhudeva. Loui has taken a liking to her, Indy is jealous .. and Ricky seems to feel at home πŸ™‚ Now we just need a huge saint-bernard that we can call Martin πŸ™‚

Food is not cheap

One of the challenges that good & sustainable farming deals with is market prices. General wisdom amongst both producers and consumers seems to be that food is or should be cheap. General wisdom is wrong.

Satisfying Hunger

When we were still living in Israel we couldn’t afford organic products but we did make it a point to eat good nutritious whole wheat bread. It cost 3 or 4 times more then the standard white bread. This went on for many years until one day we forgot to purchase our good bread and had to settle for the regular white bread that was available in the small village shop. The bread felt empty, I had to eat twice as many slices of bread as I was used to just to satisfy my hunger. So the real price of this “cheap” bread was actually twice its label price.

Nutritional Value

That same bread had very poor nutritional value. I could at best get more calories (energy) from eating more of it but no matter how much of it I ate … I couldn’t consume what wasn’t there. There are many nutritional elements that our bodies need and expect to find in food. If those elements are not in the food we eat then we don’t supply our bodies with what they need. From there one of three things can happen:

  1. We live with deficient nutrition … and that leads to health problems which come with a heavy price (monetary and then some).
  2. We rely on food supplements that are very expensive for regular consumption.
  3. We eat too much … our bodies continuing to look for what they need … and we become overweight … fat … and obese … and that leads to other health problems which come with a heavy price.

So how cheap is that cheap food?

But even that is not the whole story.

Subsidies

In most western/industrialized countries many (if not most) food products are “protected” and regulated by subsidies. There can be diverse motivations for subsidies but the end result is that government controlled funds are passed on to producers. If, for example, egg production in your country is subsidized, that means that in addition to profits from selling eggs, a producer receives additional payment from the government. “From the government” really means “from taxpayer money” and that really means “you”.

So when you, for example, purchase an egg, in addition to what you pay in the store, you have already paid an additional sum of money through subsidies. How much? I don’t know … but it can be a substantial amount of money. Many farmers have become reliant on subsidies (rather then profits) for their sustenance.

Now consider that subsidies are just one form of market manipulation. They are a simple manipulation because they directly allocate resources for a specific purpose. What about indirect interventions? What effects do trade agreements between countries have on food prices? What effects do trade agreements between international corporations have on food prices? What effect do trade agreements between countries and corporations have on food prices? And for Romanians … what effect does corruption have on food prices?

Food is not cheap. Period.

The bottom line is that whatever you pay for food in a store does not reflect the true price (let alone value) of food. Food is more expensive to produce and deliver then we want to believe it is. It’s easy to blame large corporations and corrupt governments but we have all worked together to create this situation. We were convinced that industrialization and commercialization would be a good thing – we liked the idea of being able to have anything we want to eat available to us for low prices whenever we want it. Governments merely represent us and our desires. Large companies merely look for potential markets and try to make a profit from them. We all worked together to create the food reality we live in … and for a while it seemed nice.

Yet is hasn’t worked out has it? Food prices went up. So, being true to our dreams, we continued to push … food became even more indutrialized, efficiently processed … and …Β  less tasty and less nutritious … and sometimes unhealthy (in some ways even poisonous). And still food prices continued to rise … and still do … everywhere. We ended up paying more and getting less. This is a direct result of all of us, together, pursuing our dream of cheap food. Maybe its time to dream up something better?

Dreaming up something new isn’t easy to do. It demand personal sacrifice and change. We all have to re-examine our values:

  • Do we prefer to eat cheap food or healthy food?
  • Do we prefer poor food all year long or healthy food when it is naturally available?
  • Do we prefer that others prepare and pre-process our food for us or to take the time to lovingly prepare and cook our own food?
  • Do we prefer a global menu of food that comes from all over the world or a menu that is based on what grows locally?
  • Do we prefer to support industrial food production (large corporations) or small-scale local producers (our neighbors)?
  • Do we prefer “organic” food that is transported long distances or local, traditional food that is grown nearby?
  • Do we want to be dependent on international corporations for our food supply or do we want to be a self-sufficient community?
  • What is more important to us: fast cars, fancy furniture and electronic gadgets or food?

We dreamt up and created our current food-reality. We can dream up and create a better one.

Community First?

When we came to Romania I was socially drained. Despite recurring creative attempts, I could find no way to partake, contribute or benefit from society while living in Israel. As a result I came to Romania wanting to be left alone. I just wanted to retreat to our own place in the village, to create a self-sustainable life and forget about people.

Yet very shortly after we arrived here we started meeting beautiful people. People who shared our life values, who are on their own paths of exploration and discovery, people we could relate to, people we were drawn to (people who were English speakers … so instead of my Romanian getting better, Andreea’s English got better). I am not saying that Romania is made of up just these people, it isn’t, they are still a minority. But they are the people who kept appearing in our life. This took me by surprise.

Still, once we moved out to Bhudeva, we landed in a fairly reclusive lifestyle. The people are still there, but more distant and though the bonds are strong we see less of them. My Romanian is still coming along slowly because we spend most of our time here πŸ™‚ Andreea is naturally socializing more then me through her interest and work with Feminitate and the fact that she is a native speaker.

When we moved out to Bhudeva the one thing we (I more then Andreea) wanted was to build a new house. That didn’t work out, and still hasn’t. We have begun numerous experiments including composting toilets, hugelkultur raised beds, natural poultry keeping, natural beekeeping which are fascinating and going very well. Yet very soon after we moved out we came to a sobering realization about self-sustainability. There is no such thing. Sustainability can only be achieved through collaborative effort. To put it more simply … sustainability can only be achieved in community. Yet community was a mystery to us (me more then Andreea).

Then came Cutia Taranului and spread its wings. It takes up much of our time and attention. Andreea spends much time on the phone talking to peasant families describing to them the project and then guiding them into it when they choose to join. She is also constantly monitoring and making sure that information flows smoothly between village and city. I have been very busy setting up all the technical aspects that she uses to contain all the information and vibrant energy that the project has created (and when need or opportunity present themselves I too speak about it) . Then we realized (it was more of a surprise to me then to Andreea) we are building a community. Though we are using technology to do it, it is a very real community where real people are connecting in real life around real needs … with real food!

Though I still feel an egoistic need to be in house that will better support and embrace us, we don’t even have plans drawn out for one. However we seem to be very busy building … of all things …Β  a community πŸ™‚ I came here from a modernized, advanced, western-cultured country yet with a heavy load on my shoulders. I am now living a much simpler life in an immature country (there’s no way around it, as a country, as in an organized society, Romania … sucks) yet I feel at home amongst my neighbors and touched by a growing community of people all over Romania who’s values seem to much more aligned with mine. So much so that I feel that, working from the stomach up, there is a We, I am part of it … and We can do some great, sustainable things for Romania together.

Wednesday - June 13, 2012

I just wanted to take a few minutes to make note of some things that have happened in the last … oh I don’t know … days.

We harvested some tilia flowers and set them to dry to be used for tea.

We harvested some elder flowers in mociu and made some “Socata” which is a wonderful and refreshing drink and set some aside to dry also for tea.

We went for another yearly Ecoruralis meeting at Hermitage Malin. We learned about the continued aggressions of agro-business (through corrupted governance) towards … well … almost everyone except their local industrial-farming partners. As we move into the peasant/producer camp these aggressions have deeper implications. We had a great opportunity to share Cutia Taranului with the present members and with guests Steph and Kate from Arc2020. We were embraced with curiosity and support which continued to resonate with us for a few days. Cutia Taranului, as most of our endeavours, are usually met with doubt and skepticism … so passionate embrace was hugely refreshing and nourishing.

On the way back we harvested more elder-flowers … much more. This time we began to process it for making juice concentrate. Today we will probably finish the process (boiling with sugar and then bottling for preservation).

The raised beds are coming along quite well. We have remulched most of the established potatoes. We didn’t bury them too deep so the mulch should provide them with additional growth space, moisture and nourishment.

We processed our first winter-food preserves … yes already. We purchased from Ildi and Levente peas and spinach. We podded and froze the peas. We washed, chopped and froze the spinach in useful batches. We planted some of our own but consumed some of it, we may consume some more, but much of what we have grown will be set aside for seeding next year.

We ordered and received a large supply of fire wood (~10 cubic meters) of oak and cedar. There is now much chainsawing and chopping to do to store it for drying. Most of is designated not for the coming but the following winter … we want our wood as dry as possible. This coming winter we should be able to get by with some wood left over from last year together with all the scrap wood we have set aside.

We are continuing to make preparations for the delivery of the first boxes of Cutia Taranului. Bread and baked goods boxes to Bucharest and Cluj are set to start next week. Vegetable boxes shortly after. We are in touch with a few more peasants who are making preparations to join Cutia Taranului. The information system is coming together very nicely. More functionality and modules are being added as they become relevant and their development matures.

We have begun to collect the materials we need to get started building our first solar dryers (which could already have been handy with the tea flowers).

The days are now long and getting to be hot. Work outside is in the mornings and evenings. The rest of the time is spent either in the shade (workshop included) or indoors.

This year is very different from last year. Last year was a race to finish basic preparations for winter. This year there is no rush. For the most part we can take our time and enjoy the work we have to do. We are embraced in a diverse variety of efforts. Things are moving along quite nicely and at a pleasant pace.

 

Tereza & Xena

We have two hens who are mothers to chicks (two more are still brooding, as are two muscovite ducks). For the first few days they moved around freely until we moved them together with their nestboxes into the electric-fence perimeter. We have inspired, educated and entertained watching them and their chicks. Our hens did not go broody so both hens are on loan from our neighbors. Both are mothers to a small number of chicks due to an egg fertility problem we had.

Xena is a relatively thin, dark colored and featherless-necked hen. She is fiercely protective of her 3 chicks.

Tereza is a puffier, tan & white colored, full feathered hen. She is a more soft, rounded mother. In the first few days we chicks sitting on her and later she was the one we saw with just the head of a chick sticking out between her feathers.

Xena was the first to leave the barn with her chicks. She would find a quiet spot and just sit outside with her chicks rather then sitting inside the barn. One time she chose a location that is on a “path” that leads away from the house. The dogs were alerted to something and darted on that path. We saw trouble coming but couldn’t respond fast enough. Indy jumped over them, Loui tried to do the same but he is a smaller dog. It was amazing to see the relatively small bodied Xena attack him and push him away from her chicks and back towards the house. Loui was very confused and we were very proud … both of Xena and her protective instincs and of Loui who submitted to her (we had to train him to not attack or attempt to eat members of our flock).

Xena and Tereza stay fairly close together though Xena gives Tereze trouble. If Tereza ventures too close to Xena, Xena will lash out at her, give her a good bite and then chase her for quite a while … even after Tereza has backed off and tried to open distance between them.

Xena keeps her chicks busy throughout most of the day. Tereza can be found sitting peacefully with her chicks around or under her.

Once, when we closed them for the night, chicks got mixed up … 5 ended up with Tereza and 2 with Xena … all chicks were warmly embraced … yet in the morning one of the chicks with Tereza lept out and joined Xena. Apparently the chicks do know and prefer to be with their mothers πŸ™‚

Both mothers are exceptional at feeding. They constantly scratch and point out food to their chicks who follow and eat diligently. Sometimes we wonder if and what the mothers eat? When we gave them corn they didn’t touch it … they don’t approach anything that is not suitable feed for the chicks (the corn is way too large for the chicks).

The chicks gradually expand their circle of security … that is how far and how long they can be from their mother on their own. Their confidence grows every day.

Both mothers and chicks have already explored the mobile shelter. When it rains they find shelter in it, when it stops they resume their travels. The chicks look healthy and vital, they’ve discovered their wings and we can see them jumping longer distanced in growing arches πŸ™‚

The chicks eat very little feed (we usually make available to them in the morning and in the evening). They get most of what they need directly from the (currently poor) pasture. We have already witnessed both mothers and chicks ignore feed, preferring to explore what the pasture has to offer.

We have some predatorial birds who take an interest in the chicks. Both mothers are extremely protective. They get very loud when a bird is anywhere near them … even if sitting on a high power line). They get very aggressive when a bird makes an attempt at the chicks. However the most impressive behavior we have witnessed has been a collaborative effort. Tereza, the puffy hen, took all the chicks in under her while Xena went on the offense. Each mother went to her forte and the predators didn’t stand a chance.

This morning we left the mothers and chicks closed in their nestboxes because it is a fairly damp and cool morning and we don’t want to risk the chicks catching cold (they are very vulnerable when they are young). We heard Xena and Tereza shuffling around wanting to get out but decided to wait and see how the day evolves. Well, they didn’t want to wait and in what we can only assume was a collaborative effort mananged to topple the front cover that blocks the entry to their adjoining nest-boxes. They are now freely ranging in the moist day. We are confident the chicks will find all the warmth they need with their mothers πŸ™‚

Here in Romania, most chicks (and chickens) are kept in some form of captivity. Even if they have some free ranging space it is usually not very green (usually over grazed for years) and there are too many of them on it. Most require (expensive and labor intensive) feeding all year long. Chicks particulalry, are kept for many weeks in confined and sheltered spaces with their mothers and live entirely off supplied feed. Yet our chickens and chicks, who require very little feed from spring to fall, are healthy and, as others have pointed out, larger then typical chickens. We have been asked numerous times for eggs for other broody hens because “our chickens are larger”. Our explanations that the chickens are larger because off lifestyle rather then genetic have fallen on mostly deaf ears … and … ironically our eggs were not very fertile (due to too many males residing over too few hens).

 

Dear Cutia Taranului Members

We are nearing an exciting time. We are preparing to send you notifications that your first boxes will soon be arriving. Up until now you were anonymous people who filled out a form on a website … that is about to change πŸ™‚

Did you notice that we refer to you as “Members” and not as “Customers”? Customers simply pay for a service or product. Cutia Taranului is a product and a service and more. It is about a healthy, collaborative relationship between peasants and … well … you. Relationship implies a caring and conscious effort on both sides. We have been speaking to peasants about their part. About growing food responsibly, packaging it effectively, delivering it reliably and learning to appreciate the wonderful qualities of this new relationship with … well … you πŸ™‚ Your part in this new relationship has the potential for more then just trading a few bills of money for a box of food.

To share with you what more you can do to make this relationship healthy we feel the need to share with you a bit about what we’ve learned about the peasant families who will be appearing at your door. They are caring people that, for the most part, do what they do with a sense of purpose and appreciation. They work hard (sometimes too hard). Yet they have been cornered into a difficult position that forces them to sell their products within constraints that make it very difficult for them to make a decent minimal living … despite the caring hard work. As a result they feel unappreciated and cornered. Being cornered makes them doubtful, untrusting and fearful.

Most peasants have reached out to us after hearing about Cutia Taranului from others … and yet they were doubtful. They were trying to understand what were we not telling or even hiding from them? Would they have to sign a contract that traps them somehow? (no, like you, we prefer relationships based on faith and trust). Even when they were holding the first members lists in their hands they were doubtful. Even after they spoke to you and found encouraging and supportive voices they continued to be doubtful. They were and continue to be afraid they would lose “customers” if the price was too high or if the contents of the box were fixed (which we asked them to create to keep things simple and feasible for them) instead of “bending to the will” of individual paying customers customer.

Even now, when they are about to bring their produce to you, who have demonstrated to them that you really do care, they are afraid of doing anything to lose you as a customer.Β  They are afraid because they have reason to be. Over the years they have been losing customers and finding it harder and harder to make a living. They are coming from a world of distrust and often abuse and we are inviting them to an embracing world of trust and appreciation. They are afraid because Cutia Taranului is a challenging mental and cultural shift for them. Its a lot for them to take on.

What ultimately opened up their minds was not us but you. When you filled an online form it was an act of pure good will and faith on your part. When you answered them with enthusiasm on the phone you offered them encouragement and support. What remains for you to do is … to keep on doing what you’ve already been doing. Embrace them. Let them know you do care about and do appreciate their efforts. When they’ve made you happy let them know. If there’s something you don’t like, let them know too … share your thoughts and feelings with the same supportive care you do when you are happy.

Please be responsible and fair in you relationship with them.Β  Creating and maintaining new, healthy and hopefully long-term relationships is going to take conscious and caring effort from everyone. If at any point you find it difficult to continue making this effort on your own please reach out to us so that we may try to help.

In our (Andreea and Ronen) hearts and minds, you and the peasants are making a difference. Cutia Taranului is so much more then growing and consuming food. We believe that your good will and faith in each other is both proving that Romania is already a better place than most people make it out to be (so many locals and foreigners like to put Romania down as a backwards and corrupt country) and at the same time making it an even stronger, resilient and healthier place to live in. We are awed and inspired by you.

We wish you delicious food and inspiring transformation πŸ™‚

To Find Our Place

“One of the most joyous things we can do is to find our place, the land where we belong. Having found our place, we snuggle into it, learn about it, adapt to it, and accept it fully. We love and honor it. We rejoice in it. We cherish it. We become native to the land of our living.”

Carol Deppe

Monday - June 4, 2012

So despite soap making plans, today was a day of butchering. We had been planning for some time to get rid of excess male presence and energy in the flock (both amongst the chickens and the muscovite ducks). Today we finally went ahead and did it. We also slaughtered one hen that was showing signs of illness … we had been monitoring her for a few days and she wasn’t getting any better … so to we culled her (as food for the dogs). Then we went ahead and butchered one of our two roosters … I thought he would be harder to catch (he was very aggressive) but it turned out he is more bark then bite. Then we went on to slaughter two of the male Muscovites. I did the killing and Andreea did the cleaning and hacking.

The ducks were much harder to handle then the chickens. They are really strong and strike out with their short feet like crazy. They also took much longer then the chickens to die. The first one managed to get free from Andreea’s grip … splashing the bowl of blood mostly on Andreea and a bit on me. Andreea looked like a character out of a Rambo movie. We got a much better hold of the second one (Andreea his body and I his head) and managed to create a much calmer experience for everyone. The duck feathers were also much more difficult to remove … at one point Andreea gave up and skinned them … removing skin and feather leftovers together.

We cooked a chicken soup for the dogs with the hen-parts. We cooked an amazing chicken soup for ourselves. Despite my vegetarianism I make it a point to taste from the meat of every animal I participate in butchering. However the Muscovite meat that we baked in the oven was a rare treat and I had a decent helping of meat … my first in a long time (at least 12 years).

It was interesting to feel killing in my gut … not as an emotional or physical sensation … I was completely at peace doing the killing. It was an experience of energy …Β  of taking a life.

All of the water heating and cooking took place on the outside twin-rocket stove we re-assembled this morning. Summer is here. It was great fun being outside almost all day and feeding the rocket stove as work was coming along.

Β 

In the early afternoon hours two tractors appeared and finally laid the 2nd layer of gravel (on top of the first layer of larger stones that we put in last year) on the last 200m+ of road that lead to our property.

 

Sabine and Ina have been with us for the past few days …Β  in the background of the day Ina baked a fantastic bread. So we just came in from a late night snack of fresh bread and jams while watching a fantastic thunderstorm (my first one … so up close and personal).